Sun claims US government stalled its Grid over state security

Sun has claimed that the US government has held back its plans to launch its Sun Grid supercomputing project to customers.

Sun has claimed that the US government has held back its plans to launch its Sun Grid supercomputing project to customers.

Sun says the US Government has insisted on tight controls over who can use the high volume computer processing capacity, amid fears that foreign companies and organisations subject to US export bans or controls could be allowed to freely use the computing power.

The $1 per central processing unit (CPU) per hour Sun Grid service is aimed at organisations such as banks, animation studios and research bodies which need to address fluctuating computer processing needs.

The service was launched in a blaze of publicity 18 months ago but has not got off the ground.

Sun claims the launch, which should have happened at the beginning of last year, has been hampered by US government controls over who can access the service.

But Sun also admits that one highly publicised potential deal with an anonymous bank has collapsed over the bank’s security and compliance demands regarding its data.

Sun claims it walked out on the bank after protracted negotiations over who was primarily responsible for the data.

The access controls demanded by the US government now mean the service can not be made available to users in certain countries. And those that do sign up have to wait 24-hours before using the service, to enable Sun to check that they are not in violation of US export controls.

Although Sun says the roll-out of its grid is imminent, it will not now be the universally accessible grid as first envisaged.

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