No security scare in scrapping Patch Tuesday

Microsoft’s failure to issue its September “patch Tuesday” security update is not necessarily a bad thing

Microsoft’s failure to issue its September “patch Tuesday” security update is not necessarily a bad thing and illustrates the difficulties of producing 100% error-free software, say analysts.

 

Microsoft scrapped this month’s security patch, which was set to be released this week, after unspecified quality issues were discovered.

 

The company had planned to release at least one “critical” fix for its Windows operating system but the company’s security team will now conduct further tests before its release, possibly next month.

 

Butler senior research analyst, Michael Azoff, says,”Writing code is more difficult than ever because there are so many more streams – the web, mobile etc – that need to be covered. Quality control is important and it’s good to see companies putting it to the fore and not releasing software that has bugs in it. Microsoft hasn’t been so good at this in the past and should be applauded for doing it now.”

 

He adds, “In general there are a number of initiatives to try to improve the way software is developed. The advent of the concept of application life cycle management means a much more managed approach is being taken and it’s no longer adequate to allow developer to write in isolation.”

 

“Model driven architectures as championed by Object Management Group are also helping. These allow you to model processes and generate skeleton code with a click, with details filled in by a developer. Microsoft is perhaps the only big player that is not a member of the OMG but the model driven aspects of forthcoming releases, such as .net in November, are a good thing

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