UK firms ignore ID theft

One in five employees has gained unauthorised access to data, according to the 2006 DTI Information Security Breaches Survey.

One in five employees has gained unauthorised access to data, according to the 2006 DTI Information Security Breaches Survey.

Little headway in tackling ID and access management has been made since the last report two years ago. Large companies have experienced a small increase in the number of security incidents.

These disappointing results are partly because many firms don’t use the full range of authentication techniques available. A worrying 80% of companies still rely solely on passwords.

“Too many companies are still relying on single factor authentication techniques such as user ID and passwords,” says Andrew Beard, director at PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, which conducted the survey for the DTI.

“More companies need to follow the lead of the few larger businesses, which are using stronger methods to authenticate their users.”

Those companies that do employ stronger authentication techniques such as biometrics, reported fewer incidents. But a worrying 80% of companies still rely solely on passwords.

Employees are the weakest link in a security strategy. Research compiled for IT security company Trend Micro this week reveals that UK employees have a cavalier attitude to their PC usage at work. Over half the workers interviewed said they relied on the IT department to sort out any problems and were less careful with their online behaviour at work than at home.

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