Getting the blues from Bluetooth

It seems as if security goes in one ear and out of the other when supposedly 'security- aware' office workers leave their buildings and turn on their mobiles and PDAs.

It seems as if security goes in one ear and out of the other when supposedly 'security- aware' office workers leave their buildings and turn on their mobiles and PDAs.

A recent survey of commuters at three Central London railway stations revealed that I in 10 travellers had left Bluetooth enabled on their devices, leaving them at risk of eavesdropping by would-be hackers.

Personal data, including voice messages, address books, e-mails and diaries stored on mobile devices could be extremely vulnerable to theft or manipulation, said Orthus, which carried out the survey.

Hackers could download the data or change it across open Bluetooth channels without the owners being aware. About half the mobile devices were left on their manufacturer's default security settings, leaving them vulnerable to attack.

Methods of preventing such threats include corporations adding PDA and mobile phone policies to their corporate security policies, and making sure their staff are mobile-security aware by not enabling Bluetooth until they need it. Personalising the Bluetooth device's name so that model and manufacturing information are hidden is another option.

There's only one good thing to come out of Bluetooth security threats, and that's the name given to them: Bluesnarfing! Who makes these names up?

Read more on Wireless networking

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close