Berners-Lee comes back to Britain to work on web's next generation

Internet pioneers from around the world celebrated the 10th anniversary of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) last week as Tim...

Internet pioneers from around the world celebrated the 10th anniversary of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) last week as Tim Berners-Lee, the man credited with inventing the web, announced that he was coming back to Britain to work on its development.

Berners-Lee will take up a chair of computer science at the University of Southampton's school of electronics and computer science.

He will hold this position as well as being senior research scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and director of the W3C.

Berners-Lee will work on the semantic web, the next generation of the web, which he described as "an extension of the current web in which information is given well-defined meaning, better enabling computers and people to work in co-operation."

The semantic web will provide a common framework which will allow data to be shared and reused across applications, enterprises and communities.

Wendy Hall, head of the school of electronics and computer science at Southampton, said, "Many of the staff in the school have worked with [Berners-Lee] on the development of the web over many years.

"We are now closely involved with the evolution of the semantic web, which is his vision for the future."

Nigel Shadbolt, director of the Advanced Knowledge Technologies Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration, the largest semantic web project in the UK, said, "Berners-Lee's appointment is a fantastic boost to our work and it enables us to deepen our involvement with US and European initiatives."

Read more on Data centre hardware

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

SearchCIO

SearchSecurity

SearchNetworking

SearchDataCenter

SearchDataManagement

Close