IBM touts its technology durability

IBM officials last week hailed the supplier's On Demand computing strategy and emphasised that customers can count on the...

IBM officials last week hailed the supplier's On Demand computing strategy and emphasised that customers can count on the continued existence of its technologies. 

Steve Mills, IBM's senior vice-president and group executive in the IBM software group, touted the strength and popularity of IBM product lines during a keynote speech at the IBM developerWorksLive conference. He said, for example, that the WebSphere applications platform has 50,000 customers, that the Eclipse development platform has had 6.9 million downloads, and that the DB2 database has more than 400,000 customers. 

"These things are important because you want to make investments in technology that are going to be durable, that are going to last, that are going to be improved," Mills said. "You are looking for durability, you're looking for a level of certainty in what are clearly uncertain times." 

IBM again pushed the company's On Demand strategy, also called e-business On Demand, for integrated, end-to-end business processes across companies and their partners, suppliers and customers. 

The strategy leverages advanced technology and expertise to help customers increase productivity, said Irving Wladawsky-Berger, IBM general manager for e-business On Demand.

"What we cannot do is just throw the technology at our customers. Increasingly, it is our job to make sure that along with our technology, we bring the expertise," he said. 

IBM's business consulting group is looking at 17 different industries to establish best practice schemes, he said.

Mills said IBM will deliver a set of hooks, connections, and optimised routines that drive IBM language-based build tools to different run-time environments.

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