Microsoft makes concessions to DoJ

Microsoft has announced its latest round of concessions to the Department of Justice as part of the proposed settlement in its...

Microsoft has announced its latest round of concessions to the Department of Justice as part of the proposed settlement in its long-running antitrust case.

The first area the company has addressed is the forthcoming Service Pack 1 of its Windows XP operating system. Microsoft said users and suppliers would be able to change the interface of the desktop to allow current default programs like Internet Explorer, Windows Media Player, Windows Messenger, and Java Virtual Machine to be "hidden".

This will help make it easier for rivals like AOL Time Warner, Sun Microsystems and Linux companies to get their alternative desktop programs used by users.

Secondly, Microsoft has agreed to make public around 280 internal APIs of its Windows operating system to make it easier for developers and other suppliers to integrate their products with Windows. In addition, around 115 protocols which help form communications between Windows desktops and Windows servers will also be available to license from Microsoft.

The fourth area relates to extending the time and breadth of licensing agreements between Microsoft and OEMs, to make it easier for third parties to build sales around Microsoft solutions.

The DoJ has not closed its case against Microsoft and individual states are still considering their position.

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