The end of paralysing DDoS attacks?

Denial of service attacks - hacker attacks that paralyse high-profile websites - could be a thing of the past, say UK academics.

Denial of service attacks - hacker attacks that paralyse high-profile websites - could be a thing of the past, say UK academics.

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks are increasingly popular with cybercriminals, security firm McAfee warned in a November report.

But Bristol University's Department of Computer Science claims its research could end such attacks.

The research, which is to be presented at the ASIACRYPT conference in Tokyo on 6-10 December, investigates a defence technique that aims to make performing such attacks "computationally infeasible".

A second research paper written in collaboration with the University of Haifa, Israel, and Ruhr-University at Bochum, Germany, shows that a procedure thought to be only theoretical can be implemented in practice.

One goal of this collaboration is to allow for databases to compute on encrypted data, which will improve the confidentiality of personal data stored in centralised databases.

A third research paper in partnership with the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US and the Technical University in Darmstadt, Germany, considers foundational issues related to basic constructions in cryptography.

This research is an important step in understanding the properties of a cryptographic object called a "random oracle", Bristol University said.

Such objects are a popular solution in constructing efficient cryptographic schemes, such as those used in a web browser.

Read more on Hackers and cybercrime prevention

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