Female CIOs expect bigger budgets than male counterparts, says Gartner

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Female CIOs expect bigger budgets than male counterparts, says Gartner

Clare McDonald

Female CIOs expect a higher increase in their IT budget than their male counterparts, according to a survey from research organisation Gartner.

The survey, conducted in the fourth quarter of 2013, surveyed 2,339 CIOs and found women expected a 2.5% budget increase in 2014, compared with an average 0.2% increase for men in the same position.

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It was also found that, although female CIOs follow the same reporting lines as male CIOs in most cases, there were more instances of women CIOs working in organisations that also had a chief digital officer (CDO).

Tina Nunno, research vice-president at Gartner, said: “This overall increase in budget may be correlated with subsequent data that shows a slightly higher incidence of chief digital officers in enterprises where female CIOs are present and may account for the increase in budget overall, with a slightly larger percentage of female CIOs' IT budgets being outside of the IT department.”

Only 6% of male CIOs worked in organisations that also had a CDO, compared with 8.5% of female CIOs, the research found.

When rating their most important priorities, there proved little difference between men and women in what each considered important, with business intelligence (BI), infrastructure and mobility making the top three in both cases. Women put cloud in fourth position, while men chose enterprise resource planning (ERP).

Nunno said: “The remainder of the top 10 technologies were identical for the genders, if in slightly different order. As a result, there were virtually no significant differences in the top 10 technology priorities based on gender."


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