IT education

Computer science and technology studies becoming more popular, says UCAS

Kayleigh Bateman

Candidates opting for computer science, technology and engineering degrees are on the rise, according to figures from UCAS.

Students applying for computer science courses increased by 13% this year, with just over 100,000 applicants.

43634_Students.jpg

The university applicants’ service found students applying for technology-based degree courses rose to nearly 10,000, an increase of 15% on 2013.

Engineering also saw a spike in applicants to nearly 150,000, up by 11% on last year’s figures.

Furthermore, the percentage of applications for computer science, technology and engineering increased more than any other subject.

Computer science as a group subject was ranked the ninth most popular, with 103,590 applications. Engineering ranked sixth, with 148,950 applicants. Technology was second from bottom, with 10,290 applicants.

The most popular subject group applied for was medicine, with 381,050 applications. Business and administration studies ranked second, with 301,080 applications, followed by creative arts and design with 258,870, biological studies with 241,680 and social studies with 214,730.

Stephanie Fernandes, institution of engineering and technology education and skills policy advisor, said: “The UCAS figures show very welcome increases in university application figures for engineering, computer sciences and technologies courses.

"With engineering companies projected to have 2.74 million job openings between 2010 and 2020, there is an urgent need to encourage many more young people into engineering to meet demand. We hope this rise will continue over time, and, along with the many other initiatives, will help to fill the skills void facing the engineering sector.”


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy