Newcastle and Milton Keynes sign BDUK contracts

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Newcastle and Milton Keynes sign BDUK contracts

Jennifer Scott

Another two contracts have been awarded to BT by local authorities to roll-out superfast broadband as part of the government’s BDUK scheme.

Newcastle City Council has signed a deal worth £3.8m to ensure 97% of homes and businesses in the area will have the faster connectivity by 2015, with £1.89m coming from BT and the rest of the funding split equally between the authority and central government.

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Milton Keynes Council, Central Bedfordshire Council and Bedford Borough Council have joined forces and agreed a contract worth £12m to bring 91% – the equivalent of 32,000 premises – speeds of at least 24Mbps by 2016. Here the funding is split with £6.2m from BT, £2.4m from Milton Keynes, £1.2m from Central Bedfordshire and £0.44m from the Borough Council. The BDUK pot will top this up with £2m.  

“This is great news for the people living in these areas,” said Bill Murphy, managing director of next generation access at BT.

“It is important to support local economies, as well as helping new development and infrastructure in these communities. This is where fibre broadband can play an essential role by revitalising towns, villages and hamlets, helping businesses to be connected in these locations.”

There are now only seven contracts left to be signed for the overall BDUK project. However, local councils are still being coy at releasing data of where the exact footprint of the state funded roll-outs will be, despite instruction from the department for culture, media and sport to publish data as soon as possible.

For a full run down of the impact of the scheme, read our analysis here.


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