PM calls meeting to tackle online porn

News

PM calls meeting to tackle online porn

Warwick Ashford

Prime minister David Cameron has called a meeting with internet firms to discuss ways of blocking images of child sex abuse and to prevent children from viewing pornography online.

He believes internet firms are not doing all they can to remove illegal material and prevent children from accessing legal adult content, according to the BBC.

The government is believed to be looking for proactive ways to block all access to hardcore porn sites, or at least require people to register with search engines to access such sites.

The call comes after child pornography featured in the recent trial and conviction of child killers Mark Bridger and Stuart Hazell.

Bridger, sentenced to life in May for the murder of five-year-old April Jones in Machynlleth, Powys, searched for child abuse and rape images ahead of his victim’s disappearance.

Hazell, jailed for life in May for murdering 12-year-old Tia Sharp, was found to have an "extensive" collection of pornography featuring young girls.

The meeting, scheduled for 18 June in Downing Street, is to be chaired by culture secretary Maria Miller and attended by representatives from Yahoo, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Facebook, BT, Sky, Virgin Media, TalkTalk, Vodafone, O2, EE, Three and the Internet Service Providers Association (ISPA).

ISPA has said filtering tools should be more widely available, but does not want to impose settings by default, calling instead for education of parents to make safe choices for their children.

ISPA is expected to use the Downing Street meeting to emphasise what the industry is already doing to block access to images of child abuse and criminally obscene adult material.

Attendees of the meeting are also expected to be asked to discuss ways of dealing with copyright theft through illegal music or file-sharing websites.

Ahead of the meeting, BT has announced that it is blocking access to web pages on the Internet Watch Foundation's list of identified images of child sexual abuse.

Google has also announced several initiatives aimed at tackling the problem, according to the BBC.  

The company plans to help create a database of images to improve collaboration between the police, companies and anti-abuse charities.

Google also plans to put $2m into a “Child Protection Technology Fund” to reward software developers working on programs to help eradicate abuse images.

As the government seeks to find a way to crack down on internet images of child abuse, campaigners are calling for the criminalisation of possessing internet pornography depicting rape

Earlier this month, more than 100 anti-rape groups and campaigners sent a letter to the prime minister on the issue.

The campaigners argue that such material "glorifies, trivialises and normalises" the abuse of women and girls, undermining the work done by the government towards preventing sexual violence.


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy