Brocade names Lloyd Carney as CEO

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Brocade names Lloyd Carney as CEO

Jennifer Scott

Brocade has announced Lloyd Carney as its new chief executive officer (CEO), taking over with immediate effect.

Networking firm’s former CEO, Mike Klayko, announced he would be stepping down from the role in August 2012 after seven years running Brocade, but promised to stay at the San Jose headquarters until a suitable replacement was found.

Carney’s last job was as CEO of Xsigo Systems, which specialises in datacentre virtualisation, but was bought by Silicon Valley heavyweight Oracle in July last year

Before that, he had a number of high profile networking positions, including CEO of network management software firm Micromuse and chief operating officer (COO) of Brocade's rival, Juniper Networks.

“I believe Brocade is poised to leverage its heritage of strong innovation and significantly disrupt the status quo in the data-networking industry,” said Carney. 

“There are profound changes happening across high tech today and Brocade has a great opportunity to lead that transformation through differentiated products and customer focus.

“Success here will accelerate profitable growth for our company and drive further value for our shareholders. I am very excited and honoured to lead Brocade at this time.”

As well as becoming CEO, Carney will join Brocade’s board of directors.

David House, chairman of Brocade’s board praised the new leader, adding: “Mr Carney has a relentless passion for driving innovation and operational excellence.

“These characteristics, combined with his track record of execution including delivering growth and increasing shareholder value, make him an outstanding choice to lead Brocade into its next phase.”


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