Apple unapologetic in admitting Samsung did not copy iPad

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Apple unapologetic in admitting Samsung did not copy iPad

Warwick Ashford

Apple has published a statement on its website acknowledging a High Court ruling that Samsung did not infringe Apple design patents in the UK.

However, the unapologetic statement concludes that, while the UK court did not find Samsung guilty of infringement, other courts have recognised that Samsung “willfully [sic] copied Apple's far more popular iPad.”

Apple was forced to publish the statement after losing an appeal earlier this month against a High Court order in July, requiring the action after ruling that Apple failed to prove Samsung copied its iPad design.

Apple is required to keep the statement on its website for six months.

The ruling also requires Apple to take out adverts in national newspapers saying that Samsung did not copy its designs in creating its Galaxy Tab 10.1, Tab 8.9 and Tab 7.7.

The order, which followed Apple's failed attempt to block sales of Samsung's Galaxy Tab tablets, said the notices must make reference to the court case and should be designed to "correct the damaging impression" that Samsung's tablets had copied the look of Apple's products.

But in the statement, Apple highlights comments made by the High Court judge in his ruling contrasting the rival products in which he said the Galaxy Tabs lacked the iPad’s simplicity and were “not as cool”.

The statement also points out that a German court found that Samsung engaged in unfair competition by copying the iPad design, and that a US jury found Samsung guilty of infringing on Apple's design and utility patents, awarding over $1bm in damages to Apple.

It does not mention that in addition to the UK, Apple has lost patent infringement cases against Samsung in the Netherlands and Australia.

 


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