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Fujitsu joins CityFibre in £50m broadband push

Jennifer Scott

While the UK’s largest cities have the likes of BT and Virgin Media building up their broadband connections, CityFibre has signed a new contract with Fujitsu to help “second-tier” cities get online.  

The deal was announced this week and will see CityFibre pay £50m to Fujitsu to plan, build and operate a fibre infrastructure, which will provide next-generation broadband to homes and business.

CityFibre has already done a lot of the groundwork for its first target city, York, after announcing its fibre-to-the-premises (FTTP) plans last month, but hopes to ramp up the roll-out, giving 95% of all the city’s businesses a minimum connection of 25Mbps by the end of 2014, thanks to the new deal.

The firm will also continue to build on its second project in Bournemouth – its largest fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) implementation – giving 24,000 homes up to 1Gbps by the close of 2012.

A spokesman from CityFibre said there was no set date for the contract to expire, but the deal with such a large force in the IT world would bring “confidence to partners, customers and investors” for the projects.

Andy Stevenson, CEO of Fujitsu Telecommunications in Europe, added: “This project takes advantage of all Fujitsu’s core competencies including planning, building and operating next-generation access networks across the world."

The FTTH plans do not stop at these two cities, and CityFibre hopes to roll-out the carrier-grade network to many more homes and businesses across the UK, with a goal to reach one million homes and 500,000 businesses.  

The company is managing more than 100 private fibre projects across the UK within seven different metropolitan areas. These include partnerships with local authorities, universities and the police. It has also laid almost 30,000km of cables across the UK.


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