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Everything Everywhere part sale being considered

Karl Flinders

Everything Everywhere has become the subject of industry speculation, with Deutsche Telekom said to be considering selling its share of the business.

The mobile operator was created by Orange and Deutsche Telekom-owned T-Mobile in the UK, and as a result became the UK’s biggest operator with around 30 million customers.

According to reports, Deutsche Telekom is considering selling its share of Everything Everywhere to raise funds, after a proposed sale of T-Mobile USA failed.

The company is currently in the midst of a huge IT project to consolidate the systems of the two mobile operators and move large parts of the shared IT infrastructure to the cloud.

Everything Everywhere has a publicly stated target to put 40% of its IT in the cloud within three years. The project is being supported by Deutsche Telekom’s IT services arm T-Systems.

The Orange and T-Mobile UK merger meant the new entity had 660 internal applications. Its ambition is to reduce this to 50. For example, there will only be one instance of applications such as customer relationship management (CRM), finance and accounting, supply chain, human resources, business intelligence and campaign management.

The rapid growth of mobile operators has led to the creation of a plethora of new applications.

Although IT savings of 25% are expected from the integration of the two companies, it is not just about becoming more efficient internally. The reduction of applications will improve the level of service offered to customers. The company is also consolidating its 13 datacentres to just two. Virtualisation, as well as a reduction in overlap, makes this possible.


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