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Unions give go-ahead to one strike against Fujitsu, and call off another

Kathleen Hall

Unite union members working for Fujitsu in Crewe and Manchester are to strike, while members of the Public and Commercial Services (PCS) union on the same day called off strike action against the Japanese outsourcing giant on a separate pay-related issue.

Members of the Unite union working for Fujitsu in Crewe and Manchester have voted to take 24-hour strike action on 19 September, over allegations that ex-worker Alan Jenney was singled out for redundancy because of his union membership activity.

On the same day, PCS called off industrial action after Fujitsu offered workers on its public sector contracts a pay rise worth more than twice the rate of inflation. The deal will mean some workers who were paid just £13,500 two years ago will now not be paid less than £15,500, an increase of almost 15%.

PCS' 720 members working on contracts across the UK for DVLA, HM Revenue and Customs, Home Office, Ministry of Defence and Office of National Statistics, were planning a co-ordinated strike with colleagues from the Unite union on Monday 19 September.

PCS general secretary Mark Serwotka said: "This is a major deal for these private sector workers, particularly the lowest paid, who do essential work supporting our public services.

"While we have called off our strike, we send solidarity and support to members in Unite and call on the company to sit down with their representatives to resolve the issues."

Fujitsu workers at Crewe have already had one day of strike action on Thursday 30 June, over the issue of Jenney's redundancy. They have also taken industrial action consisting of a continued work-to-rule and a policy of non-cooperation.


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