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Turkish authorities detain 32 suspected Anonymous members over cyber attacks

Warwick Ashford

Turkish authorities have detained 32 people, including eight minors, said to be involved in attacks by cyber activist group Anonymous.

The detentions were made as part of raids in 12 provinces after Anonymous launched a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on the Turkish telecoms regulator's website last week. Anonymous also hacked the website of Turkey's election board ahead of weekend national elections, according to Anatolia, the state news agency.

The DDoS attacks were carried out by Anonymous over concerns the Turkish government is increasing its monitoring and blocking of websites, according to the Financial Times.

"Over the last few years, we have seen how the Turkish government has tightened its grip on the internet," Anonymous said in a posting on its website last week. "Accessing and participating in the free flow of information is a basic human right. Anonymous will not stand by while the Turkish government violates this right."

The group's campaign in Turkey follows a wave of protests over the government's plans to introduce a new internet filtering system and orders by Turkey's communications regulator to exclude from domain names hundreds of words deemed suspect.

The detentions in Turkey follow the detention of three people in Spain suspected of involvement in a series of attacks on Japanese firm Sony. Anonymous supporters responded to the arrests by downing the Spanish police's website for a few hours at the weekend.

Anonymous has also attacked companies perceived to be acting against Wikileaks and has made several politically motivated attacks against the websites of governments in Iran, Tunisia and Egypt (see videos below).


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