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IT standards needed to help green automotive industry

Antony Savvas

IT standards are needed to green the automotive industry, says the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and the Formula One motor racing organisation.

Max Mosley, head of Formula One governing body FIA, has called for faster development of standards to support IT in vehicles to improve safety and reduce environmental impact.

Speaking at the ITU's annual Fully Networked Car event at the Geneva Motor Show, Mosley said F1's expertise in developing green technologies could have applications beyond the sport, particularly in fuel efficiency and monitoring environmental impact.

Most F1 teams have as many as 300 channels of information flowing between their cars and the pit crew, and as systems become more complex, their interconnection will become critical, he said.

Dr Hamadoun Touré, ITU secretary-general, said, "With the Fully Networked Car we can provide traffic management, monitoring and analysis, all of which will help meet the climate change challenge.

"Those who successfully meet this challenge will end up with a real competitive advantage in world markets."

Michel Mayer, chief executive of Freescale Semiconductor, a supplier of IT to F1, said he was concerned at the proliferation of proprietary standards, and called for global standards bodies such as the ITU to take a lead.

He said it was critical for developments to be standards-driven.

Standards priorities identified at the event included: a common set of standards for all nomadic devices standards for software-defined radios standards to cover the gap between the short lifecycle of mobile phones compared with the relatively long lifecycle of cars and privacy - the need for a common understanding about what data is reasonable to collect and retain.





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