Next-generation datacentre gets green light

News

Next-generation datacentre gets green light

Huw Evans

The concept of the next-genration datacentre has moved a step closer to reality .
 
The Canberra Technology City (CTC) is planned to become a world first in datacentres where a power station will be built along side a specialised datacentre campus. It will deliver a complete infrastructure solution comprising a co-generation power station to provide energy efficient electricity, heating and absorption chilling for the datacentre buildings. This is claimed to be the first of its type in the world.
 
The approval from the local utilities firm ActewAGL board comes after three months of marketing by the consortium which includes the developer and investor - Technical Real Estate, UK-based datacentre designer – Galileo Connect and international real estate agents – CB Richard Ellis.
 
ActewAGL Chief Executive Officer John Mackay said, “The approval to proceed with the project was a reflection of the high demand for a secure and scalable specialised datacentre campus, which would meet and exceed world’s best practice in terms of carbon emissions. The level of interest from local, national and international organisations was remarkable and the number of registrations could potentially fill the campus twice over.”
 
CTC plans to accommodate over 30 datacentres across two strategic sites in Hume and Belconnen. The next phase in the development is to formalise lease agreements with interested occupiers and to finalise the development application.
 
Occupiers are intended to benefit reducing the need for onsite diesel generators and fuel storage in each datacentre and from a significant reduction in carbon emissions as well as the opportunity to lock in long-term power costs with an on site energy provider.


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy