IT industry sleep-out raises £325,000 for charity

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IT industry sleep-out raises £325,000 for charity

Computer Weekly Staff

This year's Byte Night charity sleep-out by 270 IT professionals raised a record £325,000 to aid NCH's campaign against youth homelessness.

This brings the total sum raised by Byte Night since it started nine years ago to more than £1.8m. Participants in the annual event - a ­token night spent sleeping rough to highlight the problem of youth homelessness - include some of the most senior UK IT staff from user firms, suppliers and consultants.

Byte Night, which has been supported for many years by Computer Weekly, was founded by IT public relations consultant Ken Deeks and Ernst & Young's technology sector director James Bennet.

"This is a record breaking year, and a most unbelievable team effort," said Deeks. There were several company teams, including Dell, BT, Hewlett-Packard and Barclays Capital, which raised an average of £4,900 each. Individual sleepers averaged £1,600.

Stephen Murdoch, vice-president for global infrastructure services at Dell, which raised £14,000, said, "For us, Byte Night is a chance to give back to the community and put our corporate social responsibility strategy into practice."

Next year is Byte Night's 10th anniversary. The event will be held on Friday 3 October 2008, again near London's Tower Bridge. Individuals taking part will be expected to raise at least £2,000 each and company teams at least £5,000 per team.

"With this level of support in year nine, just imagine what can be achieved in our 10th anniversary year," said Deeks.




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