Metropolitan Police targets efficiency with single sign on

News

Metropolitan Police targets efficiency with single sign on

Rebecca Thomson

The Metropolitan Police Authority (MPA) is hoping to save time and increase security with a single sign-on system.

The MPA's 50,000 employees were given access to six core systems using one password, after the full roll out was completed in March.

The authority's IT infrastructure plays a large part in day-to-day policing, but the volume and complexity of log-on details can lower efficiency.

Ailsa Beaton, director of information at the MPS, said, "One of my main aims is to eliminate unproductive use of officers' time, and the system also offers increased security.

"It is a key component of our long-term security and efficiency strategy, and ultimately benefits the people we serve."

Inefficient logging-on is a common problem in police forces, and one person can often end up signed-on all day while different people use the computer. This reduces security and means there is no audit trail, so it cannot be seen who has accessed what.

The MPS said the ActivIdentity system, implemented by Capgemini, is compatible with systems in the organisation's IT infrastructure.

The system is also capable of integrating with smart card technologies, if the MPS decides to implement them. Also, it is based on open standards, so can integrate into the planned Unified Police Security Architecture (UPSA). The aim of the UPSA will be to create a national identification and authorisation system for the UK police service, criminal justice system and public safety organisations, and forces will need to link their own infrastructure into it.





Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy