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Female resignation rates up

Female resignation rates in IT and other industries have hit a new high, despite women achieving promotion at a quicker rate than men.

The findings from a survey of 42,205 individuals released by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and Remuneration Economics, show that resignation rates among women stand at an average of 7.8%.

The figures also show that women are more likely to receive a bonus, but female pay rises have stalled for the first time in more than a decade.

The 7.8% resignation figure is the highest since 2002, while the survey revealed that resignation rates are lower amongst men at 6.4%.

Fewer women (2.6%) than men (3.7%) are also inclined to ask for internal transfers if they are dissatisfied with their current role.

The annual National Management Salary Survey reveals that women in the North West are the most likely to leave their jobs, with female resignation rates in the region at 9.2%.

In Scotland, the figure is only 4.9%. In terms of industry, female resignations are the highest in the retail sector, where they have doubled to 11.7% over the past year. This compares to 5.7% who resigned in the technology sector.

When it came to pay in IT, women on average earned around £2,000 less than men.

Jo Causon, director of marketing at the Chartered Management Institute, said, "It is clear that the pull of promotion is not being matched by parity in pay. Despite the weight of legislation and the reality that reward should match responsibility, gender bias seems to be getting worse, not better."

Val Lawson, chair of the Women in Management Network, said, "The fact that the proportion of women in senior positions continues to grow is encouraging, but their increasing likelihood to resign is a cause for concern.

"If employers allow this trend to continue the knowledge gap in UK organisations will be exacerbated at the very time we are trying to challenge the skills crisis."


 

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