Windows Vista's little surprises

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Windows Vista's little surprises

Windows Vista's little surprises
By Mark Minasi

Have a look inside Windows security guru Mark Minasi's latest book, Administering Windows Vista Security: The Big Surprises, with this excerpt from Chapter 1, "Administering Vista Security: The Little Surprises."



Below is a series of excerpts from chapter one of this book, Administering Windows Vista security: The Big Surprises, that have appeared on SearchWindowsSecurity.com.

How to generate actions from events in Microsoft Vista
Microsoft has improved the eventtriggers.exe command-line tool, which now allows you to attach a task to pre-determined events. This tip explains how to use this action.

Vista's event viewer improves security management
The updated Event Viewer in Microsoft Windows Vista allows for improved security event management, as it allows you to view and classify security events in your event log.

New encryption options in Windows Vista
Data encryption has a new look in Windows Vista. Read what Mark Minasi has to say about Vista encryption in this excerpt from his latest book.

LM de-emphasized, NTLMv2 emphasized in Vista
Vista introduces a rather new but good authentication method for your network security, so says Mark Minasi. Check out this excerpt for more on authentication in Vista.

Vista security option changes to named pipe access
Poorly secured named pipes are a well known way for malicious hackers to infiltrate Windows networks. A hacker could take advantage of these named pipes by connecting to a Windows system as an anonymous user. With the advent of Windows XP, however, Microsoft has taken strides to reduce the risk that named pipes and anonymous users pose.

NTFS and the Registry in Vista packaged up
Windows Vista packages the Registry and NTFS functions, omitting transaction failure and allowing for "roll backs" instead. See an example in this excerpt.

BOOT.INI is gone, BCD is here
The boot options in Vista are different from those in previous versions of Windows. Learn more about the new boot tool called BCD.

Remote Desktop gets a bit more secure
Read all about the security of Remote Desktop in this excerpt from chapter one of Mark Minasi's book, Administering Windows Vista Security: The Big Surprises.


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