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Lack of skills holds back change management

Lindsay Clark

Three-quarters of CIOs believe a shortage of skills in IT departments is hampering change-management programmes, according to research from CIO Connect

The organisation, which represents top-level IT management, found 73% of CIOs and IT managers questioned believed that the progress of change-management programmes in their organisations was being impeded by the lack of skills within their own IT department.

Meanwhile, 64% said that they had had to introduce new leaders into projects to ensure that programmes were a success.

“This is a very honest and enlightened admission by our members that IT has a fundamental role to play in the evolution of businesses and there is more to be done,” said Nick Kirkland, managing director of CIO Connect, which conducted research among its membership.

“Specialised training is the way forward and I am very encouraged to see that our members recognise this problem and are addressing it with increased training for their teams in the softer skills of project management, leadership and communication.”

About half of the 135 chief executives and IT managers responding to the survey said they would be increasing investment in training over the next 12 months to ensure their staff could contribute more in change-management programmes. Less than 4% said investment in training was being cut.

“This research highlights the important requirement for increased training for IT leaders and their teams in the field of change management,” said Glyn Evans, CIO of Birmingham City Council. “IT departments are today at the heart of successful change-management programmes, but the leadership and communication skills required to achieve success has, until very recently, not been emphasised enough. By addressing these training issues public sector services and British business competitive edge will inevitably be improved.” 

 

CIO Connect site >>
 

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