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Nisa-Today's targets RFID efficiencies

Will Hadfield

Convenience store supplier Nisa-­Today's expects to increase efficiency and security at its main distribution centre with a radio frequency identification tag implementation.

The tracking system, which is due to be completed next month, will use RFID to monitor the movement of the trailers and trucks that supply more than 5,000 stores owned by some 630 retailers.

Employees working in the warehouse will use handheld devices to record the location of every truck and trailer automatically. The data will synchronise with a new RFID-tracking feature in the AquiTec SCM/400 warehouse management system, said Wayne Swallow, Nisa-Today's IT director.

Nisa-Today's, which is owned by the convenience stores that sell its goods, has had RFID tags on its trailers and trucks since it opened a 625,000 square-foot distribution centre in Scunthorpe last spring.

Active RFID tags are embedded within electronic seals from Unisto on the trailers. The seals produce random four-digit numbers every time the doors are sealed.

Guards at the exit to the yard use an RFID reader embedded in the ground to read the active tags. The same reader checks separate passive tags on both the trailers and the trucks to confirm that drivers have selected the right load.

Before the final stage of the roll-out, staff at the distribution centre had to manually enter the numbers and the location of the trailers within the yard into the warehouse management system.

Related article: M&S RFID policy shows benefits

Link to: www.rfidjournal.com

Link to: www.nisa-todays.com

Comment on this article: computer.weekly@rbi.co.uk



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