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Citrix shuns Linux due to 'lack of demand'

Citrix says it has no interest in delivering native Linux support in its products, and that it will continue to rely on the Windows platform.

The company, which is a close partner of Microsoft, says there is no significant demand for Linux in the public and private sector.

At the firm’s annual iForum global user meeting in Orlando, Florida, Citrix chief executive officer Mark Templeton said, “There is no real demand for Linux support in our main products.”

Templeton acknowledged that the public sector in particular was moving towards adopting or partly adopting a Linux environment, but he described these moves as “experiments”.

He said, “Governments may make these moves through policy judgements, rather than business needs – that is what governments do. If there was a real business need for Linux it would be widely used by businesses, but it is not. We are doing things to address business needs, rather than for the ‘cool factor’.”

Templeton observed that open source-based collaborative products such as Star Office, sold by Sun Microsystems, “worked better on Windows anyway”.

Citrix, which is rapidly expanding its product portfolio to allow companies to accelarate and optimise the delivery of applications to employees, acquired Orbital Data to enable it to offer WanScaler, its new wide area network optimisation system.

The appliance-based product currently relies on a Linux OS, but Citrix intends introducing a Windows-based WanScaler appliance, said David Jones, Citrix vice-president for business development.

Jones also said Linux companies such as IBM, Red Hat and Novell “would be very interested” to see Citrix develop native Linux versions of its products to run on their server platforms, but he said there was no real demand for it in the marketplace.


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