Oracle releases improved open source database

News

Oracle releases improved open source database

Antony Savvas

Oracle has released an improved version of its open-source Oracle Berkeley DB Release database, aimed at developers wanting to embed a transactional storage engine within their high-performance applications.

The new Oracle Berkeley DB Release 4.5 now supports multi-version concurrency control, non-stop upgrades for replicated environments, and a pre-built replication framework to simplify development of widely available applications.

Rex Wang, Oracle vice-president for embedded systems marketing, said, “This version adds compelling new features, reduces complexity and helps developers build and deploy applications requiring fast, reliable storage without human administration.”

Multi-version concurrency control improves the performance of highly concurrent, mixed read/write systems by giving each user their own “snapshot” of the database, and managing concurrent changes by many users.

Non-stop upgrades allow a replicated Oracle Berkeley DB system to be upgraded without downtime. 
A replication framework provides a pre-built and supported set of functions for quickly building replicated or widely available systems, simplifying and accelerating development, said Oracle.

Analyst Forrester estimates the current open source database market is worth $400m (£216m) a year, which includes support, services and licenses. The analyst estimates this market will increase to $1bn by the end of 2008.

Oracle Berkeley DB Release 4.5 is available under a dual licence. A no-cost open-source licence permits redistribution if the application using Oracle Berkeley DB is open-source. A commercial licence is available for redistribution of proprietary applications. 


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy