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HP admits it also spied on lower-ranking employees

Antony Savvas

HP has admitted it spied on lower-ranking employees, as well as directors and journalists, in its efforts to plug media leaks from the boardroom.

The admission will add fuel to the ongoing investigation of the company’s actions by federal and state prosecutors.

HP chairman Patricia Dunn is to step down in January to be replaced by chief executive officer and president Mark Hurd, after ordering a media investigation that led to directors and journalists having their phone records accessed by third-party investigators.

Dunn intends to remain a director of the company from January, but her position may be in danger after she admitted in a message to HP employees that at least two of them had also been spied on.

Dunn will also be troubled to hear that state prosecutors say they are ready to bring charges against individuals at HP and outside the company for the spying. The FBI and federal prosecutors are also ready to move on the company.

Two HP directors have already resigned in the fall-out from the spying revelations, including one who admitted leaking boardroom information to the press.

 

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