News

HP chairman may be asked to resign over spying case

Hewlett-Packard is considering the fate of board chairman Patricia Dunn after revelations that she sanctioned an investigation into media leaks that led to an outside company spying on fellow directors and journalists.

The company filed details of the spying on directors with the US Securities and Exchange Commission last week, but the firm has now admitted it also accessed the phone records of journalists.

The fall-out from the leaks investigation has already led to one director resigning and another not being re-appointed to the board after he admitted leaking board discussions to the press going back to 2005.

The attorney general for California had already started an investigation into the company over the possible illegal capture of phone records of HP board directors.

The news that a group of journalists may also have had their records accessed without their knowledge is expected to fuel that investigation further.

HP has admitted that investigators used by the outside firm it hired to conduct the media leaks investigation used the practice of “pretexting”, where someone pretending to be a phone company’s customer rings up the telco for information.

The HP board met over the weekend to discuss the situation, and is considering whether Dunn should be asked to resign. Its deliberations are expected to continue today.

 

Vote for your IT greats

Who have been the most influential people in IT in the past 40 years? The greatest  organisations? The best hardware and software technologies? As part of Computer Weekly’s 40th anniversary celebrations, we are asking our readers who and what has really made a difference?

Vote now at: www.computerweekly.com/ITgreats


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy