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Analysts echo warning of Windows Vista OS delay

Tash Shifrin

Leading industry analysts have repeated warnings that Microsoft’s new Windows Vista operating system will miss its scheduled November release to major corporations.

Vista was originally scheduled for general launch this year but Microsoft announced in March that it would not be released to corporations until November or made generally available until January 2007, because the software giant was behind schedule in tackling security issues.

Steve Kleynhans, research vice-president at analyst firm Gartner, said Microsoft had made “significant improvements” in each interim build of Vista since its Beta 2 release.

But in a post on his blog he added, “However, as with most things, the devil is in the details, and at the moment, based on my continued testing and day-to-day use of Vista, the details are still pretty rough.”

The latest Vista build, 5472, was “a pretty solid platform, and one that can be used for day-to-day activities, with little fear of serious disruption”, he added. It offered better performance, greater stability and compatibility with a broader range of applications than the beta 2 version.

But there were “still a lot of holes under the surface”, Kleynhans said, including “a large number of small glitches and failures”. He added, “It's not unusual to find my system suddenly lock up for minute or longer.”

He concluded, “I don’t expect to see a finished product in November.”

 

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