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SFIA portal helps firms identify IT training needs

Bill Goodwin

An online service launched in October aims to make it easier for IT departments to identify training needs and skills gaps in their IT workforce.

The SFIA Profiler service, provided by sector skills council E-Skills UK, is designed to help managers automate the process of mapping IT job descriptions to the Skills Framework for the Information Age (SFIA).

"To try to do a skills gap analysis using bits of paper and documents is always tricky," said Terry Hook, skills development executive at E-Skills UK. "We created the service to allow managers to create job roles in SFIA language and to allow staff to evaluate against those defined job roles."

Pilot tests by Intelligent Finance and the Crown Prosecution Service have shown that the service, based on a web portal, can help employers identify hidden IT skills in their organisations.

"They were able to uncover very quickly the skills they had in their organisation that they were not aware of previously," said Hook. "One of the biggest benefits was uncovering hidden talent."

E-Skills is offering the SFIA Profiler web portal, with an optional consultancy package, to companies for an annual fee per user.

 

What is the SFIA Profiler?

The SFIA Profiler is an online skills management service, with optional consultancy, that facilitates the implementation of the Skills Framework for the Information Age.

By allowing employers to assess the competencies of IT staff, the SFIA Profiler can be used to help identify skills gaps, create job roles for staff recruitment and appraisals and help target training. It can also generate management reports to inform organisational and individual skills development.


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