Sand storms

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Sand storms

Antony Savvas

Sand Technology has developed the Sand Searchable Archive product, which is claimed to provide high data compression rates for efficient data storage without compromising the ability for business people to quickly access data.

"Users should begin to incorporate database archiving as an aspect of overall data management and infrastructure maintenance," argued Charlie Garry, an analyst at Meta Group, "We expect the database archive market to reach £1.4bn by the end of 2007."

Data warehouses are now reaching multiple terabytes in size, with no apparent end in sight. New regulatory requirements mean that this data has to be kept accessible for a number of years.

Sand Searchable Archive is designed to help organisations manage this runaway growth while maintaining service levels to data users.

"The combination of continued dramatic increases in the amounts of business data with the new regulatory and compliance environment now requires organisations to keep more data for more time in a user-accessible form," said Arthur Ritchie, Sand's chief executive.

"The Sand Searchable Archive was developed to allow organisations to fight tera-flation by efficiently keeping their historic data at lower storage costs, and still having it easily accessible to business users when it's needed."

The Sand Searchable Archive is a compact analytic data repository that typically stores data in less than 10% of the space required by an equivalent relational data warehouse. 

Sand Searchable Archive's read-only archive files can be searched using standard business intelligence tools and methods without decompressing the data first. 

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