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IT is changing the UK jobs market

Ross Bentley

Webucation architects and nano-technologists are set to become as familiar posts as shopkeepers and accountants as new technology and changing lifestyles transform the UK job market.

In the first analysis of its kind, awarding body the City & Guilds has forecast which careers are set to emerge, thrive or change over the next decade.

Although postal workers and milkmen may find themselves out in the cold, the report said it would be a boom time for personal dieticians, psychologists and plastic surgeons.

Rising affluence, complex family arrangements and an in-creased lifespan will create a demand for many different types of workers who are paid to keep people looking good and feeling physically and mentally fit.

Longevity consultants are predicted to emerge to help retired people make best use of their later years, giving advice on health, financial planning and lifestyle pursuits.

However, tomorrow's brightest children would do well to turn to science.

The hottest jobs are likely to be among nanotechnologists - scientists involved in building tiny structures - and bioinformatics specialists, who fuse technology and science to aid medical research.

Tax advisers are predicted do well thanks to an increasingly complex tax regime, and education tutors will be in greater demand as growing numbers of parents decide to "top up" their children's education.

Less job security will be enjoyed by insurance brokers and estate agents, whose roles will change beyond recognition thanks to the internet.

Chris Humphries, director general at City & Guilds, said, "We are living in an exciting era that is constantly evolving and bringing with it new career opportunities.

"Globalisation, technology and changes in consumer behaviour are the main influences in this changing job market, and it is fascinating to see what the next decade will deliver in terms of jobs.

"Indeed, 10 years ago, many people would not have known what a web page designer does."


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