April launch for Windows Server 2003

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April launch for Windows Server 2003

Microsoft has delivered the final code of Windows Server 2003 and its 64-bit SQL Server 2000 Enterprise Edition database to manufacturing.

Both products are on track for a 24 April delivery to users, the company said.

Microsoft said seven members of the Windows Server 2003 family including the Data Centre Edition, the Datacentre Edition for 64-bit Itanium 2 servers, the Enterprise Edition, the Enterprise Edition for 64-bit Itanium 2 Systems, the Standard Edition and the Small Business Server version will be available some time in the third quarter.

Bill Veghte, corporate vice-president of the Windows Server Division at Microsoft, said, "Our 300 early adopters are confirming that it is helping drive down overall IT costs and providing the high levels of performance and reliability."

Windows NT 4 users stand to benefit the most from the upcoming server. Windows Server 2003 is 100 times more scalable and does so at one-tenth the cost per transaction compared with NT 4 when that product was first introduced, he said.

Users should also experience 40% greater stability, in large part because of a more robust driver model and system recovery capabilities.

"I look at Windows Server 2003 as the foundation of a comprehensive integrated platform that cannot only lower IT costs and expenses but significantly help with better deployments," Veghte said. 

Windows Server 2003 has benefited from Bill Gates Trustworthy Computing security initiative, Dave Thompson, corporate vice-president of the Windows Server product group added.

"I've been involved in the development of every release of Windows Server, and this is by far the most secure, most reliable, highest-performing server operating system we've ever built," he said.


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