ADIC shows entry-level tape drive

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ADIC shows entry-level tape drive

Advanced Digital Information (ADIC) has announced a new kind of tape library that is smaller and less expensive than existing systems.

The Scalar 24 will ship with some of the high-end features found in ADIC's much larger tape libraries but has a price tag targeted at small and medium-sized businesses, said Steve Whitner, ADIC's director of marketing. The new library, available in October, will include high-end components such as the latest drive technology and remote management tools and will start at $12,000 (£7,733) for a unit with a single drive.

"It's the first library that we have ever offered that puts together enterprise backup features with very high value," Whitner said. "The whole goal is to get more functionality and make it for less cost."

As a medium for storing corporate data and performing backups, magnetic tapes are less expensive than disks and are especially useful for archiving large amounts of data. ADIC, based in Redmond, Washington, USA, already sells the much larger Scalar 100, 1,000 and 10K tape libraries, which allow companies to back up and store huge amounts of information from servers or other storage systems.

The new Scalar 24 library can hold as many as 24 tapes in a system 4U (7 inches) high. It supports both LTO 1 (linear tape-open) and Super DLT320 (digital linear tape) drives. The system will ship with some high-end features such as remote management software, partitioning technology to turn the Scalar 24 into two small virtual libraries, and the ability to connect the drive to a storage area network (SAN).

The system is designed for companies that have as many as 550Gbytes of data that must be backed up, Whitner said.

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