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Developer Forum: Intel promises more mobile and desktop chips

Intel will reveal details of its forthcoming mobile Banias and 3.0GHz Pentium 4 processors and will announce plans for sophisticated communications devices at its Developer Forum conference in San Jose next week.

The architecture of the Banias chip, scheduled for release in the first half of next year, will be revealed during keynotes from Paul Otellini, president and chief operating officer of Intel, and Anand Chandrasekher, vice-president and general manager of Intel's mobile platforms group.

"Banias is the first time we've developed an architecture from the ground up," said Frank Spindler, vice-president of the Intel corporate technology group.

Ron Smith, senior vice-president and general manager of the wireless communications and computing group, will discuss the new capabilities of Intel's XScale processors, which are based on a core from ARM. The XScale was introduced in February and is found in products such as Hewlett-Packard's iPaq PDA.

The forum will also focus on the convergence of communications and computing.

"Increasingly, the technologies that are appropriate for one industry are moving to the other industry," added Anthony Ambrose, director of the Intel communications group.

The last day of the show will consist of a keynote from Patrick Gelsinger, vice-president and chief technology officer of the corporate technology group, and Sunlin Chou, senior vice-president and general manager of the technology and manufacturing group.

Gelsinger and Chou will discuss the future of Moore's Law, the law developed by Intel's co-founder Gordon Moore that states the number of transistors on a chip will double every couple of years.
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