NEC claims screen first with new QXGA notebook

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NEC claims screen first with new QXGA notebook

NEC has unveiled a new model in its Versa Pro notebook computer line-up and claimed a world first by fitting the machine with a QXGA (2,048 pixel by 1,536 pixel) resolution LCD screen.

With such a high resolution screen - four times the resolution of the standard XGA (1,024 pixel by 768 pixel) resolution found on most notebook computers - NEC is aiming the notebook at graphics, computer animation and desktop publishing professionals.

The screen is not just high-resolution but large as well, measuring 15 inches (37.5 centimetres) in diagonal size, which is the same size as low-end flat-panel desktop monitors. It is a step up from the 15-inch SVGA (1,600 pixel by 1,200 pixel) resolution display available on the previous top-of-the-line Versa Pro computer.

The computer is based on a 2GHz version of Intel's Mobile Pentium 4 processor and is available through NEC's build-to-order program. A typical configuration, including 128Mbytes of DDR SDRAM, ATI Technologies' Mobility Radeon 7500 graphics card, a 20Gbyte hard disk drive, 24x CD-ROM drive and Windows XP Professional, costs ¥450,000 (£2,447).

The machine is larger and heavier than most competing laptops, measuring 32.7 centimetres wide by 27.9 cm deep by 4.8 cm tall and weighs 3.8 kilograms.

NEC has also released a lower specification machine, the Versa Pro R, with a lower resolution XGA 15-inch LCD panel and either a Mobile Celeron III or Mobile Pentium III processor. A typical configuration with a 1.06 GHz Mobile Celeron III processor and 128Mbytes of conventional SDRAM, 20Gbyte hard disk drive, 24x CD-ROM drive and Windows XP Professional, costs ¥204,000 (£1,109).

NEC said it has no plans to sell the machines outside Japan.

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