'Open' Sun blasts 'locked-in' .net

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'Open' Sun blasts 'locked-in' .net

Eric Doyle
Scott McNealy, Sun Microsystems' CEO, heralded the launch of Sun's competing architecture Open Net Environment (One) by heaping criticism on Microsoft and its rival .net strategy

Eric Doyle

Scott McNealy, Sun Microsystems' CEO, heralded the launch of Sun's competing architecture Open Net Environment (One) by heaping criticism on Microsoft and its rival .net strategy.

McNeally's aim was to underline the open nature of Sun One compared to the "locked-in" environment of .net. A major bone of contention was Java support - a key element of the Sun One architecture and a technology that Microsoft hopes to supplant with its own C# environment.

Sun's software architecture is based on existing products, with new products providing the required interoperability. The overall aim is to deliver personalised services and data based on where the user is, what devices are to hand and what their role is at that particular moment.


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