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Public network could cut 6.4% government IT costs, says Cisco survey

Government IT figures believe the government could cut 6.4% of its £16.5bn annual spending on information and communications technology (ICT) without affecting front-line services, says network equipment maker Cisco.

The latest Cisco Public Sector Network (PSN) Preparedness Survey found 37% believe the Cabinet Office's public sector network (PSN) initiative could revolutionise the way public services are delivered.

The Cabinet Office's cost-cutting initiatives are intended to save £631m a year by 2014. Its PSN initiative aims to unify public sector network standards and procurement processes.

Despite cost-cutting pressures, the survey shows public sector organisations were more concerned with getting value for money than cutting costs. Just over half thought the public sector often overpaid for equivalent services compared to private firms.

Key factors for transforming the delivery of public services were organisational culture (42%) and technology (26%).

Six out of 10 respondents had problems identifying and finding funds and 55% thought delivering within budget was a key challenge.

Almost nine out of 10 said communicating and collaborating with other government departments could be improved. Six out of 10 said everyone was responsible for making a success of PSN.

Just over half said they could improve how they bought ICT. Some 42% thought the current process focused too much on technical aspects rather and too little on business benefits.

Few wanted a single supplier, 29% preferred framework agreements and 42% liked partnerships with best-of-breed IT providers.


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