Demand for retail IT staff leaps 45%

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Demand for retail IT staff leaps 45%

Jenny Williams

Demand for IT staff in the retail sector grew 45% in the fourth quarter of 2010 compared to the same period in 2009.

According to the latest survey by Salary Services Limited (SSL) and JobAdsWatch.co.uk, the number of permanent staff recruited by retail organisations grew 5% in the fourth quarter of 2010 compared to the previous quarter, with 45% more vacancies being advertised than in the same period in 2009.

However, vacancies are still down 48% on pre-recession levels of recruitment for the sector.


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IT skills in retail

The table below show the programming vacancies retailers advertised for during the fourth quarter of 2010. Click on a skill to see more information on how demand has changed since 2007.

 

 

"This surprising figure is due to a number of factors, which include better development tools becoming available that lead to improved productivity, more reliable software and hardware needing considerably less support and operations staff to run computer centres," said George Molyneaux, research director at SSL.

"The wholesale movement to use offshore companies for both development and operational support has had a major impact on the opportunities for home-grown IT personnel. Retail, alongside finance, is one that has suffered more than most other sectors," Molyneaux added.

Salaries for permanent staff in the retail sector increased by 2% compared to 2009's figures. Salaries for project managers were down by 3%.

Demand for developers surged 24% in the last quarter of 2010. SQL being the software skill most in demand, followed by C and Java (see table).

 


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