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Open source suppliers not impressed with Oracle MySQL update

Oracle has released an update to MySQL in an attempt to boost confidence in the company's commitment to the open source software acquired with Sun Microsystems.

Concern about the future of MySQL led to an investigation by European competition authorities, which delayed approval of the Oracle acquisition of Sun by months.

The latest version of the software, MySQL Cluster 7.1, includes new functionality to automate database management and new connection tools for Java.

The release offers enhanced availability and simplified management of embedded applications, said Edward Screven, Oracle's chief corporate architect.

The released comes almost a year after Oracle announced the controversial $7.4bn deal to acquire Sun Microsystems.

But the announcement has not silenced open source community concerns over the future of MySQL.

"Oracle has already cut back the MySQL road map to avoid competing with its own database management system," said Roger Burkhardt, chief executive of open source database management company Ingres.

Oracle will try and attract MySQL developers onto a path to costly proprietary software and vendor lock-in and will not add the enterprise grade features required to run Oracle's own applications, he charged.

According to Burkhardt, Oracle will use MySQL as open source "window dressing" to try to divert the threat from open source technologies to its database and application server software.

"Oracle's customers understand the company's true intentions, and are moving to alternative solutions that are more flexible and cost effective," he said.

Many ISVs are moving away from Oracle/MySQL in favour of a genuine open source solution, said Burkhardt.


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