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Mobile World Congress: Google Nexus One gets Flash

Cliff Saran

Adobe Systems is planning to put its Flash Player on mobile devices in a move that could allow companies to offer a single website that users can browse both from a PC and a mobile phone.

The move could open up millions of applications written for Adobe's popular Flash Player to run on mobile phones, potentially making Adobe the biggest provider of mobile apps.

In theory, websites that have previously been unable to support mobile phone browsers, because of the lack of a proper mobile Flash Player, should now be available, without the need for web administrators to create separate mobile versions of their sites.

Expected in the first half of 2010, a beta of Flash Player 10.1 has been made available to content providers and mobile developers worldwide.

The player, which runs on Android, the BlackBerry platform, Symbian OS, Palm webOS and Windows Mobile, provides web browsing, access to rich internet applications and high-definition (HD) videos across screens including new tablet devices, smartphones, netbooks, smartbooks and desktop PCs.

Watch video of HTC's Google Nexus One smartphone accessing the Flash-based Sky News site:

David Wadhwani, general manager and vice-president, platform business at Adobe, said, "With the Flash Platform further advancing on mobile devices, we enable developers and content publishers to deliver to any screen, so that consumers have open access to their favourite interactive media, content and applications across platforms."

Flash Player will not be available on the iPhone. However, Adobe developers using Adobe Flash Professional CS5 with the Adobe Packager for iPhone can reuse their iPhone application code to create the same application for Android.

Related Topics: Web software, VIEW ALL TOPICS

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