Poor interviewers fail to attract talent

Employers with bad interviewing skills need to improve if they are to successfully attract talented applicants in a competitive job market, a recruitment firm says.

Employers with bad interviewing skills need to improve if they are to successfully attract talented applicants in a competitive job market, a recruitment firm says.

The IT skills shortage is making it difficult to get the right staff, and poor interviewing techniques are exacerbating the situation.

Gary Ashworth, chairman at Interquest, said a major issue for IT job candidates is the interviewing skills of potential employers, who put them off with poor personal skills.

Managers should receive some training on how to quiz candidates, and learn how their approach can affect whether or not their offer of a job is accepted.

He said, "I wish line managers would spend more time skilling themselves in the interview procedure. Companies that are being more sophisticated about the recruitment process are having a better time in terms of filling jobs."

He added that, while interviewing may appear to be a simple skill to master, managers still need to take some time to do it properly. One problem is that interviewers are often not linked to the project the candidate will be working on, and do not ask detailed questions to ascertain their suitability for the work.

"Sometimes the manager is not linked to the programme or project the candidate is applying for, and won't ask them anything related to it. It tends to be worse for contract staff than permanent staff.

"It is quite clear to some candidates that some companies don't really have any interviewing skills, and haven't received any training in simply asking people questions.

"We're not manufacturers in the UK anymore, and since human capital is such a big expense for companies it's worth being more sophisticated in the way we are hiring people."

Ashworth added that poor management of staff doesn't always end with the recruitment process, and said better appraisal processes should be put in place in some companies.

"Many people I speak to left a job because they felt they weren't progressing enough. Companies need better reviews of how people are getting on."




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