Citrix aims to ease delivery of applications to desktops

Thin client computing supplier Citrix has unveiled two new developments designed to make it easier for organisations to deliver applications to users.

Thin client computing supplier Citrix has unveiled two new developments designed to make it easier for organisations to deliver applications to users.

Citrix released details of Project Tarpon and Edgesight products at its iForum user conference in Edinburgh earlier this month.

The company announced that users could try out a limited beta of its Tarpon product. Tarpon aims to help provide "software as a service" to desktops by reducing the time it takes to deliver applications and cutting the number of software licences needed to support staff.

Tarpon allows a company to profile which applications are needed across the organisation, and then publicise them on the company network so that end-users can select them manually.

The required applications can then be streamed to groups of desktops on request, instead of all end-users in the organisation receiving large numbers of applications, many of which subsequently sit unused on their machines.

Citrix chief executive Mark Templeton told iForum that the use of the web was driving enterprise IT and that companies had to change their mindset to del­iver technology across the enterprise.

He said that IT departments had to give employees choice over which applications they used, and make them simple to use.

Tarpon comes hard on the heels of Citrix Netscaler - technology bought in by the company last year to give users a faster and safer way to deliver applications to multiple ­devices.

In another development, Citrix announced the availability of Edge­sight, an "application visibility" tool that allows IT departments to view the end-user experience of application performance.

Bank Morgan Stanley already uses Edge­sight for application usage metrics, data compliance, security auditing and capacity planning.

Citrix vice-president Lou Shipley said Edgesight could pinpoint unauthorised applications that did not work properly with others, faults in authorised applications, and undesirable data traffic, such as film clips from unauthorised websites, being transported over the network.

Read article: Server-based computing gets a lift

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