Central Scots Police fixes lost-call problem

Central Scotland Police Force has implemented a call centre to replace a system that lost 15% of its internal and external calls.

Central Scotland Police Force has implemented a call centre to replace a system that lost 15% of its internal and external calls.

The force has split its central call handling operation, which looked after 999 calls and routine internal and external calls, to achieve the improvement.

The force said its support for 999 calls had always been "excellent", mainly because emergency calls were given priority on the network, but the old infrastructure struggled to handle the 1,500 other non-emergency internal and external calls made each day.

The new call centre was set up using a £200,000 private branch exchange system from Voice Integrated Products.

Gary Lawrie, a Central Scotland Police inspector, said the force had looked at a number of applications from different companies, but that it was impressed by the "simplicity of the VIP system" which staff found easy to operate.

The call centre application uses VIP's speech-enabled multiple application platform package, including Orator, an internal speech-driven directory, and Informer, a notification product for neighbourhood watch and community affairs, as well as other telephony enhancements.

Lawrie said, "This meant that we were not just getting a call centre application, but a solution to our telephony issues across the whole force."

Another benefit from the VIP system, he said, was quick access to call statistics, so that the force can access patterns of demand by day of the week and hour-by-hour.

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