News

Computer screens reveal our personalities

How we organise our computers screens reveals a lot about our personality.

A Microsoft-sponsored study says our screens reveal our personalities, habits and ambitions.

Donna Dawson, a psychologist specialising in personality and behaviour, examined a selection of office workers' desktops as part of the study.

She told the Daily Telegraph personalities could be divided into categories, including, generic, specific place, goal-orientated, trophy, escapist, artistic and sociable.

She said: "Our desktops are our personal space and as such provide a fairly accurate personality description of an individual."

What our desktops reveal:

  • Desktop with icons strewn across screen - the owner is disorganised and tends to lose focus easily.
  • Even icons on each side - the owner values balance and proportion and tends to keep a cool head in tricky situations. Likely to be organised and dislike clutter.
  • Desktop with many rows of icons - reflects a person who needs everything to hand, likes to feel in control and on top of their life, while at the same time revealing a tendency to be slightly disorganised.
  • Personal photos as wallpaper - indicates the kind of person you are and what priorities you have. Often a parent will have a photograph of their child, or a keen traveller will have a photo of an exotic location. Photos of friends show popularity, which is useful in work environments where you need good people skills.
  • Plain blue wallpaper - suggests the kind of person who likes to keep their personal life private.
  • Trophy photos as wallpaper - can suggest a big ego and someone who revels in their past successes.

Source: Daily Telegraph


Email Alerts

Register now to receive ComputerWeekly.com IT-related news, guides and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
 

COMMENTS powered by Disqus  //  Commenting policy