Wikileaks not elected by anyone, says RSA chief

Julian Assange, founder of whistle-blowing site Wikileaks, was not elected by anyone to take on the like of the US government, says Art Coviello, executive chairman of RSA, the security division of EMC.

“I don’t recollect electing Assange to share confidential information about the US government,” he said.

In a fairly informal Q&A session with journalists at RSA Conference 2011 in San Francisco, Coviello said one of the biggest concerns about Wikileaks and its supporters is that they believe they are doing a public service.

Information security professionals and technologists have enough to deal with in the form of cyber criminals, without having something else to deal with, he said.

Coviello expressed concern that Wikileaks will popularise and promote the use of insiders by all kinds of groups to steal sensitive information.

“I hope we will be able to get ahead of the insider threat and the self-righteous ethos embodied by Wikileaks,” he said.

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"Information security professionals and technologists have enough to deal with in the form of cyber criminals, without having something else to deal with" Thank you Mr. Coviello for you candid admission that your industry is not up to the job.
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"Information security professionals and technologists have enough to deal with in the form of cyber criminals, without having something else to deal with" Thank you Mr. Coviello for you candid admission that your industry is not up to the job.
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Ah yes, of course, the US security industry is such an impressive model of governance, transparency and Chinese walls...
Does this ridiculous executive not see that organisations like Wikileaks are an inevitable response to the extraordinary corruption evident in the "revolving door" that characterises the relationships between government departments and the (exceedingly secretive) private security industry, especially in the USA (take a good, hard look at Mike McConnell, for example)? People actually do want to know what's being concealed - current efforts to extract information from the UK government about the basis for Sir Philip Green's report on government inefficiencies are proving fruitless thus far, despite multiple Freedom of Information requests and an appeal to the Information Commissioner.
Yes, there's a need for cybersecurity, but simply dismissing something like Wikileaks as a confused, self-important piece of puffery is to miss the underlying point entirely, regardless of one's personal opinion of Julian Assange.
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