Twitter's ecosystem points to revenue for the real time web

One of the biggest bits of news from Le Web in Paris this week was news that Twitter is actively embracing the developer community by opening up its API to everyone.

As Adam Tinworth’s blog post (highlighted above) points out that Twitter had to embrace the developer community if it wanted to be a real time information source for the web. That’s why there’s already 50,000 Twitter apps out there. So it has started to build its own ecosystem… and that’s where the business model is.

Ecosystems are interdependent. The various forms that make it up require and need each other to survive in that habitat – and that is what Twitter is developing. A whole ecosystem of services and apps that rely on the real time data that Twitter and its users generate.

The business model is to allow revenue to move from Twitter to platform partners. Twitter develops commercial arrangements with those who build chargeable services out of Twitter, so the ecosystem begins to develop some revenue….and throw in the deals that Twitter has done with Google and Bing and a business model and revenue streams start to flow between Twitter and its partners.

Nick Halstead, CEO of TweetMeme a company that uses the Twitter firehose to show how retweets are being propagated around the web, told me at Le Web, that 2010 will be the year that the real time web finds its revenue and begins to develop its business model.

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It is astonishing to think there are 50,000 apps for Twitter, but they will need to distil this down significantly to a manageable ecosystem if they are to maximise potential. Twitter could be swamped if they don’t structure that aggressively and set up very simple commercial models to engage suppliers. Finding the right focus on partners in a fickle market will not be trivial.
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An interesting aspect of the realtime web is that non-stories and rumours can propagate really quickly. This is not so for the traditional web where news stories are hours, or even days old before they appear in search results.

As the realtime web matures perhaps we need to introduce 'trusted source' status or some other mechanism to validate information?
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An interesting aspect of the realtime web is that non-stories and rumours can propagate really quickly. This is not so for the traditional web where news stories are hours, or even days old before they appear in search results.

As the realtime web matures perhaps we need to introduce 'trusted source' status or some other mechanism to validate information?
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