Iconic Apple could fetch 80 grand

With hardware margins about as thin as an After Eight these days, the opportunity to flog a personal computer that could be worth up to £80,000 is not to be sniffed at.

With hardware margins about as thin as an After Eight these days, the opportunity to flog a personal computer that could be worth up to £80,000 is not to be sniffed at.

Unfortunately for the channel, the computer in question is currently in the hands of auction house Christie’s.

Apple IThe Apple I, believed to be the twenty second model ever produced, once belonged to Joe Copson, a former Apple employee and Atari programmer.

The $666.66 (about $2,500 or £1,600 in today’s money) PC was introduced by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in July 1976 at the Homebrew Computer Club in Palo Alto.

The first models, which were little more than a pre-assembled motherboard, and were sold without casing, power supply, keyboard or monitor, were shipped directly to buyers from Jobs’ parents’ garage.

Famously, Jobs and Woz sold some of their most treasured possessions, including a Volkswagen camper van and an HP scientific calculator to develop the first Apples. About 200 of them built before it was discontinued in October 1977, and it is thought that there are now less than 50 left.

“This is the computer that started Apple, now recognised as the most valuable company in the world; its significance in making computer technology accessible for all cannot be undervalued,” said Christie’s scientific specialist, James Hyslop.

The iconic PC will be on display at a public exhibition on the weekend before Christie’s Travel, Science and Natural History sale on 9 October.

Read more on Desktop PCs

Start the conversation

Send me notifications when other members comment.

By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

Please create a username to comment.

-ADS BY GOOGLE

ComputerWeekly.com

SearchITChannel

Close